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The Future Of Relationships? Soon Millions Of Men Will Be Having Sex With Life-Like Female Robots

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The Future Of Relationships?

Soon Millions Of Men Will Be Having Sex

With Life-Like Female Robots

Asuna Life-Like Female Robot by A-Lab in Japan

If men had a choice between real women and female robots that were almost “virtually indistinguishable” from real women, which would they choose?  Certainly many men would never be willing to totally give up on relationships with living, breathing women, but as robotic technology continues to advance at an exponential rate there will be men (and women) that will be tempted to abandon real relationships entirely.  And that day is approaching a lot faster than you may think.  As you will read about below, incredibly life-life female robots are being introduced in Japan right now.  The creators of these robots are not designing them for sexual intercourse at the moment, but experts say that it is only a matter of time before this technology is adapted for such purposes.  The potential market for female sex androids is absolutely massive, and there are no laws against such a thing in most countries.  But as men all over the globe begin acquiring these sex droids, what will that do to real relationships between men and women and what will that say about our society?

With each passing year, robots are becoming much more like humans.  And for some reason, many of these robot designers purposely choose to have their robots resemble very attractive young women.

One of these very attractive female robots, “Asuna”, has created quite a stir in Japan recently.  The following is from a recent Daily Mail article about this remarkable droid…

Chillingly life-like robots are causing a storm in Japan – where their creators are about to launch them as actresses, full-size mechanical copies for pop idol fans, and clones of the dearly departed.

There is even talk that the naturalistic, even engaging, she-droids may be taken up as men as partners in the not-too-distant future.

Android Asuna was a star attraction at Tokyo Designers’ Week showcase earlier this month and she is one of a series of geminoids, as their inventor dubs them, that are ripe for commercialisation say their creator robotics professor Hiroshi Ishiguro.

The video that I have posted below contains footage of Asuna.  As you can see, she has been designed to very closely resemble a 15-year-old girl

 

Of course Asuna is not a sex robot, and her designers do not anticipate making her into one.  But experts say that it is only a matter of time before this kind of technology is adapted for such purposes.  In fact, there are firms over in Japan that are already making sex dolls with skin texture that is “indistinguishable from the real thing”…

‘Physical relations will be possible in general with such androids,’ said Takahashi Komiyama.

‘Androids for the sex industry are a definite possibly. Some have even fallen in love with Ishiguro’s geminoids. So we can’t rule those relationships out.’

Japan already boasts the world’s most advanced sex dolls from firms such as Kanojotoys or Orient Industries based in Tokyo.

Around £6,000 buys the very superior Yasuragi ‘dutch wife’ sex doll with extras such as movable eyes and flexible fingers and a skin texture its makers say is indistinguishable from the real thing.

Lady Gaga was so impressed with their quality that she asked the Japanese firm to make dolls in her own image.

And Asuna is far from the only highly advanced female android being developed over in Japan right now.  For example, just check out the video footage from Japan that I have posted below.  As you watch this video, try to figure out which of the people are real and which of the people are just robots.  As you can see, it is not too easy to do…

Since most nations do not have laws against sex with robots, and since there is so much money that could potentially be made, many experts are forecasting that “relationships” with female sex androids will soon become commonplace.

David Levy, the author of Love and Sex with Robots, says that it is inevitable that many people will gladly choose robots as lovers and spouses as this technology progresses…

In time, Levy predicts, it will be quite normal for people to buy robots as companions and lovers. “I believe that loving sex robots will be a great boon to society,” he says. “There are millions of people out there who, for one reason or another, cannot establish good relationships.”

And when does he think this might come about? “I think we’re talking about the middle of the century, if you are referring to a robot that many people would find appealing as a companion, lover, or possible spouse.”

So what would all of this mean for real human relationships?

Already, we are at a point where relationships between men and women in our society are at a crisis point.  The following is an excerpt from one of my previous articles entitled “The Economics Of Marriage“…

According to a startling new study conducted at Bowling Green University, the marriage rate in America has fallen precipitously over the past 100 years.

In 1920, there were 92.3 marriages for every 1,000 unmarried women.  In 2012, there were only 31.1 marriages for every 1,000 unmarried women.

That is not just a new all-time low, that is a colossal demographic earthquake.

That same study found that the marriage rate has fallen by an astounding 60 percent since 1970 alone.

As a result, U.S. households look far different today than they once did.

Back in 1950, 78 percent of all households in the U.S. contained a married couple.  Today, that number has declined to 48 percent.

Obviously, adding female sex robots to the mix is not going to help things.

As a society we are more isolated individually than we have ever been before, and providing men the temptation of female sex robots would only make it even more difficult for them to establish meaningful real life relationships.

But is there anything that we can do to stop this technology?

After all, it seems like robots are starting to take over everything.

For instance, Microsoft has replaced some human security guards with five-foot-tall robots that can do many things that humans simply cannot do…

Microsoft recently installed a fleet of 5-feet-tall, 300-pound robots to protect its Silicon Valley campus. The robots are packed with HD security cameras and sensors to take in their organic, protein-based surroundings. There’s also an artificial intelligence on board that can sound alarms when the robot notices something awry. It can also read license plates and cross-reference them to see if they’re stolen.

The K5 robots come from a California company called Knightscope, which calls the robots “autonomous data machines” that provide a “commanding but friendly presence.” Sounds like something a robot manufacturer would say.

Video of these amazing little security robots is posted below…

So what happens when robots can do virtually everything better than humans can?

What will society look like?

And are these technologies going to make our lives much better or much worse?

Please feel free to share your thoughts by posting a comment below…

Last Updated on Saturday, 22 November 2014 11:40
 

FS10 King Air BE200 Flight from GCN to LAS

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FS10 King Air BE200 Flight from GCN to LAS

 

'Skyscraper' Roller Coaster, in Orlando, will be World's Tallest

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'Skyscraper' Roller Coaster, in Orlando, will be World's Tallest

Video by US Thrill Rides (Skyplex)

 

The company behind the world's tallest roller coaster coming to Orlando in 2017 has released a stomach-turning video simulating what the twisting Skyscraper will look like when it terrifies people riding it over International Drive.

 

This rendering shows the “polercoaster” Skyscraper, which will stand 570 feet tall over International Drive.

 

READ MORE AT: http://www.tampabay.com/things-to-do/travel/florida/video-shows-ride-on-worlds-tallest-roller-coaster-being-built-in-orlando/2206951

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 19 November 2014 07:32
 

Facial structure predicts goals, fouls among World Cup soccer players

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Facial structure predicts goals, fouls among World Cup soccer players

Date:
November 12, 2014
Source:
University of Colorado at Boulder
Summary:
The structure of a soccer player's face can predict his performance on the field -- including his likelihood of scoring goals, making assists and committing fouls -- according to a new study.
 
World Cup soccer players with higher facial-width-to-height ratios are more likely to commit fouls, score goals and make assists, according to a study by a researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder.
Credit: Keith Welker
 

The structure of a soccer player's face can predict his performance on the field -- including his likelihood of scoring goals, making assists and committing fouls -- according to a study led by a researcher at the University of Colorado Boulder.

The scientists studied the facial-width-to-height ratio (FHWR) of about 1,000 players from 32 countries who competed in the 2010 World Cup. The results, published in the journal Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology, showed that midfielders, who play both offense and defense, and forwards, who lead the offense, with higher FWHRs were more likely to commit fouls. Forwards with higher FWHRs also were more likely to score goals or make assists.

"Previous research into facial structure of athletes has been primarily in the United States and Canada," said Keith Welker, a postdoctoral researcher in CU-Boulder Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the lead author of the paper. "No one had really looked at how facial-width-to-height ratio is associated with athletic performance by comparing people from across the world."

FWHR is the distance between the cheekbones divided by the distance between the mid-brow and the upper lip. Past studies have shown that a high FWHR is associated with more aggressive behavior, with both positive and negative results. For example, high FWHR correlates with greater antisocial and unethical behavior, but it also correlates with greater success among CEOs and achievement drive among U.S. presidents.

READ MORE: Science Daily

 

 

 

Finding 'lost' languages in the brain

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Finding 'lost' languages in the brain: Far-reaching implications for unconscious role of infant experiences

Date:
November 17, 2014
Source:
McGill University                         
Summary:
An infant's mother tongue creates neural patterns that the unconscious brain retains years later even if the child totally stops using the language, as can happen in cases of international adoption, according to a new joint study. The study offers the first neural evidence that traces of the "lost" language remain in the brain.

This is a 3-D rendered view of fMRI activation patterns for processing Chinese tones showing the unique pattern for the monolingual French group, and similarities in the patterns of activation for both the Chinese-French bilingual and the International Adoptee groups.
Credit: Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University
 
 
An infant's mother tongue creates neural patterns that the unconscious brain retains years later even if the child totally stops using the language, (as can happen in cases of international adoption) according to a new joint study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -- The Neuro and McGill University's Department of Psychology. The study offers the first neural evidence that traces of the "lost" language remain in the brain.

"The infant brain forms representations of language sounds, but we wanted to see whether the brain maintains these representations later in life even if the person is no longer exposed to the language," says Lara Pierce, a doctoral candidate at McGill University and first author on the paper. Her work is jointly supervised by Dr. Denise Klein at The Neuro and Dr. Fred Genesee in the Department of Psychology. The article, "Mapping the unconscious maintenance of a lost first language," is in the November 17 edition of scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The Neuro conducted and analyzed functional MRI scans of 48 girls between nine and 17 years old who were recruited from the Montreal area through the Department of Psychology. One group was born and raised unilingual in a French-speaking family. The second group had Chinese-speaking children adopted as infants who later became unilingual French speaking with no conscious recollection of Chinese. The third group were fluently bilingual in Chinese and French.

READ MORE:  Science Daily http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141117164334.htm

Last Updated on Tuesday, 18 November 2014 19:57
 

Automated taxiway guidance simulation trials demonstrate reductions in aircraft taxi times, fuel and emissions

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Automated taxiway guidance simulation trials demonstrate reductions in aircraft taxi times, fuel and emissions

Automated taxiway guidance simulation trials demonstrate reductions in aircraft taxi times, fuel and emissions | Fraport,SESAR Simulation testing of the taxiway procedure (photo: Fraport) Wed 28 Aug 2013 – Preliminary evaluation of data following simulation trials at Frankfurt Airport in late June shows that aircraft taxiing procedures could be speeded up – saving time, fuel and emissions – by using automated taxiway guidance. At busy airports, cockpit crews are currently directed by radio to the assigned taxi route by apron controllers but the aircraft can be put on hold at traffic crossings before accelerating onwards, so increasing fuel consumption and time spent taxiing. In the simulation testing, performed by 20 pilots from different airlines, an intelligent taxiway lighting system procedure, dubbed ‘Follow the Greens’, was instead used to direct the crew in an uninterrupted traffic flow. The trials were carried out as part of the Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) programme aimed at modernising and harmonising European airspace.

READ MORE: Greenaironline.com

 

HIGH HOPES - David Gilmour

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HIGH HOPES - David Gilmour

 

Police Cars that Monitor the Police Coming in 2015

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Police Cars that Monitor the Police Coming in 2015

 

According to at least one study, observing police officers on the job leads to a massive decrease in citizens making brutality complaints. Now that same philosophy is being taken with how officers drive their cars while on the job. Ford, makers of various Police Interceptor models, has developed a system that relays telematics of driver behavior directly back to HQ, presumably for a heavy-set officer to scream at them when they get back. The system, designed in partnership with Telogis, monitors if drivers are flashing their sirens to get through red lights, driving over 110mph and even if they're not wearing a seatbelt. As much as this is designed to protect the public, it's also received acclaim from the police's own memorial charity, since automobile accidents have been the biggest cause of fatalities for the bulk of the last 15 years. According to Autoblog, the LAPD is already considering a purchase, which can only be a good thing, right?

Source: Telogis

Last Updated on Friday, 07 November 2014 03:32
 

String field theory could be the foundation of quantum mechanics: Connection could be huge boost to string theory

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String field theory could be the foundation of quantum mechanics: Connection could be huge boost to string theory

Date:
November 3, 2014
Source:
University of Southern California
Summary:
Scientists propose a link between string field theory and quantum mechanics that could open the door to using string field theory as the basis of all physics. Their calculations "could solve the mystery of where quantum mechanics comes from," said a co-author.
 
 
Artist's abstraction (stock illustration).
Credit: © agsandrew / Fotolia

 

Two USC researchers have proposed a link between string field theory and quantum mechanics that could open the door to using string field theory -- or a broader version of it, called M-theory -- as the basis of all physics.

"This could solve the mystery of where quantum mechanics comes from," said Itzhak Bars, USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences professor and lead author of the paper.

Bars collaborated with Dmitry Rychkov, his Ph.D. student at USC. The paper was published online on Oct. 27 by the journal Physics Letters.

Rather than use quantum mechanics to validate string field theory, the researchers worked backwards and used string field theory to try to validate quantum mechanics.

In their paper, which reformulated string field theory in a clearer language, Bars and Rychov showed that a set of fundamental quantum mechanical principles known as "commutation rules'' may be derived from the geometry of strings joining and splitting.

"Our argument can be presented in bare bones in a hugely simplified mathematical structure," Bars said. "The essential ingredient is the assumption that all matter is made up of strings and that the only possible interaction is joining/splitting as specified in their version of string field theory."

Physicists have long sought to unite quantum mechanics and general relativity, and to explain why both work in their respective domains. First proposed in the 1970s, string theory resolved inconsistencies of quantum gravity and suggested that the fundamental unit of matter was a tiny string, not a point, and that the only possible interactions of matter are strings either joining or splitting.

Four decades later, physicists are still trying to hash out the rules of string theory, which seem to demand some interesting starting conditions to work (like extra dimensions, which may explain why quarks and leptons have electric charge, color and "flavor" that distinguish them from one another).

At present, no single set of rules can be used to explain all of the physical interactions that occur in the observable universe.

On large scales, scientists use classical, Newtonian mechanics to describe how gravity holds the moon in its orbit or why the force of a jet engine propels a jet forward. Newtonian mechanics is intuitive and can often be observed with the naked eye.

On incredibly tiny scales, such as 100 million times smaller than an atom, scientists use relativistic quantum field theory to describe the interactions of subatomic particles and the forces that hold quarks and leptons together inside protons, neutrons, nuclei and atoms.

Quantum mechanics is often counterintuitive, allowing for particles to be in two places at once, but has been repeatedly validated from the atom to the quarks. It has become an invaluable and accurate framework for understanding the interactions of matter and energy at small distances.

Quantum mechanics is extremely successful as a model for how things work on small scales, but it contains a big mystery: the unexplained foundational quantum commutation rules that predict uncertainty in the position and momentum of every point in the universe.

"The commutation rules don't have an explanation from a more fundamental perspective, but have been experimentally verified down to the smallest distances probed by the most powerful accelerators. Clearly the rules are correct, but they beg for an explanation of their origins in some physical phenomena that are even deeper," Bars said.

The difficulty lies in the fact that there's no experimental data on the topic -- testing things on such a small scale is currently beyond a scientist's technological ability.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Southern California. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Itzhak Bars, Dmitry Rychkov. Is string interaction the origin of quantum mechanics? Physics Letters B, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2014.10.053

Cite This Page:

University of Southern California. "String field theory could be the foundation of quantum mechanics: Connection could be huge boost to string theory." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 November 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141103142326.htm>.
 

High-fat diet postpones brain aging in mice

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High-fat diet postpones brain aging in mice

Date:
November 5, 2014
Source:
University of Copenhagen – The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
Summary:
New research suggests that signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if placed on a high-fat diet. In the long term, this opens the possibility of treatment of children suffering from premature aging and patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
 
Coconut oil and fresh coconut (stock image). The researchers see a particular positive effect when the mice are given the so-called medium chain fatty acids -- e.g., from coconut oil.
Credit: © Picture Partners / Fotolia

New Danish-led research suggests that signs of brain aging can be postponed in mice if placed on a high-fat diet. In the long term, this opens the possibility of treatment of children suffering from premature aging and patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The research project is headed by the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen and the National Institute of Health.

When we get older, defects begin to develop in our nervous system, our brain loses some of its intellectual capacity, and the risk of developing diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's increases. Alzheimer's disease is currently the fastest-growing age-related disease.

Throughout our lives, it is important that our cells -- to the extent possible -- keep our DNA undamaged, and, therefore, the cells have a system that repairs the damage that occurs all the time. Humans age when the repair system ceases to function. In diseases such as Alzheimer's, the researchers also see damage to the DNA

A new research project headed by the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen and the National Institute of Health has studied mice having a defect in their DNA repair system. In humans, this defect causes the disorder Cockayne syndrome, where patients prematurely age as children and die at an age of 10-12 years. The study shows that placing a mouse model of Cockayne syndrome on a high-fat diet will postpone aging processes such as impaired hearing and weight loss.

Fat putting a stop to premature aging

"The study is good news for children with Cockayne syndrome, because we do not currently have an effective treatment. Our study suggests that a high-fat diet can postpone aging processes. A diet high in fat also seems to postpone the aging of the brain. The findings therefore potentially imply that patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease in the long term may benefit from the new knowledge," says Professor Vilhelm Bohr from the Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen and the National Institute of Health, who has headed the study.

Our brain has a constant need for fuel in the form of either sugar or so-called ketones. Ketones are the brain's fuel reserve, and, in particular, play an important role in periods of low blood sugar levels, e.g. if you are fasting. This is because the body breaks down fat if it needs sugar, and during this process it produces ketones. The researchers see a particular positive effect when the mice are given the so-called medium chain fatty acids -- e.g. from coconut oil.

Brain cells need extra fuel

"In cells from children with Cockayne syndrome, we have previously demonstrated that aging is a result of the cell repair mechanism being constantly active. It eats into the resources and causes the cell to age very quickly. We therefore hope that a diet with a high content of coconut oil or similar fats will have a beneficial effect, because the brain cells are given extra fuel and thus the strength to repair the damage," says postdoc Morten Scheibye-Knudsen from the National Institute of Health.

The study has just been published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Copenhagen – The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Morten Scheibye-Knudsen, Sarah J. Mitchell, Evandro F. Fang, Teruaki Iyama, Theresa Ward, James Wang, Christopher A. Dunn, Nagendra Singh, Sebastian Veith, Md Mahdi Hasan-Olive, Aswin Mangerich, Mark A. Wilson, Mark P. Mattson, Linda H. Bergersen, Victoria C. Cogger, Alessandra Warren, David G. Le Couteur, Ruin Moaddel, David M. Wilson, Deborah L. Croteau, Rafael de Cabo, Vilhelm A. Bohr. A High-Fat Diet and NAD Activate Sirt1 to Rescue Premature Aging in Cockayne Syndrome. Cell Metabolism, 2014; 20 (5): 840 DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2014.10.005

Cite This Page:

University of Copenhagen – The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences. "High-fat diet postpones brain aging in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 November 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141105112614.htm>.
 

Free Webinar - Advanced Flying with the Ipad and ForeFlight

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Free Webinar - Advanced Flying with the Ipad and ForeFlight

 

Some Fun in the Sky!

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Some Fun in the Sky!

 
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